Home » Wireless Phone » Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3K 16.05 MP Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera with 3-Inch OLED – Body Only (Black)

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3K 16.05 MP Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera with 3-Inch OLED – Body Only (Black)

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3K 16.05 MP Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera with 3-Inch OLED – Body Only (Black)
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3K 16.05 MP Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera with 3-Inch OLED – Body Only (Black)


Product Added : February 16th, 2014
Category : Wireless Phone

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3K 16.05 MP Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera with 3-Inch OLED – Body Only (Black)


Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3K 16.05 MP Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera with 3-Inch OLED - Body Only (Black)

Meet the DMC-GH3, a new and highly evolved model from LUMIX, creator of the world’s first digital single lens mirrorless (DSLM) camera.

The body has been engineered to incorporate a 16.05MP Digital Live MOS Sensor, a 4-CPU Venus Engine, and a newly designed low-pass filter. Advances have been made in video performance as well. In addition to supporting a wide range of recording formats, the DMC-GH3 features a special heat-dispersing design for extended high-quality recording. And its magnesium alloy frame is tightly sealed to resist splashes and dust, making the DMC-GH3 rugged enough to withstand the rigors of professional use.

The LUMIX GH3 was designed from the ground up to provide seamless multi-media performance for both stills and videos. It may well be the world’s first camera to please professional photographers by offering them the best of both. Camera Type – Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera Image Sensor – Live MOS Sensor, 17.3 x 13.0 mm Sensor Size, 16.05MP Effective Mount – Micro Four Thirds mount Dust Reduction System – Supersonic wave filter LCD Monitor – Free-angle 3.0-inch OLED Monitor with Static Touch Control (614K dots, 3 – 2 aspect, 100% FOV) Viewfinder – OLED Live View Finder with Eye Sensor (1.744M dots, 100% FOV) Live View – Still image – Max. 2x, Motion images – 2.4x, 3.6x & 4.8x; Guide Lines & Real-time Histogram Recording Media – SD/SDHC/SDXC Memory card (UHS-I compatible) Flash – TTL Built-in Flash GN12 @ ISO100 & Flash Sync Socket Microphone/Speaker – Stereo/Monaural Formats – Image – JPEG (DCF, Exif 2.3), RAW, MPO (3D); Video – AVCHD v2, MPEG4-AVC (H.264, MOV, MP4) Still Image Size – Up to [16 - 9] 4608×2592(L); [4 - 3] 4608×3456(L) Motion Image – Up to AVCHD Full HD 1920 1080, 60p; MOV Full HD 1920×1080, 30p; MP4 Full HD 1920×1080, 60fps ISO – Auto 200 – 12800, Extended ISO 12800 – 25600 Exposure Mode – Program AE, Apertur

  • Full Area Touch Control Auto Focusing
  • Cinematic Full HD Video 1080/60p (H.264)
  • Ruggedized Splash and Dust Proof Diecast Body for Ultimate Reliability
  • High Speed Contrast AF Accuracy
  • Built in Wi-Fi and double OLED Display

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What customers say about Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3K 16.05 MP Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera with 3-Inch OLED – Body Only (Black)?

  1. 106 of 114 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Best Micro Four Thirds Camera on the Market (for now), February 16, 2013
    By 
    mrxak
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3K 16.05 MP Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera with 3-Inch OLED – Body Only (Black) (Electronics)

    Professional image quality testing has been done, and the verdict is in. This camera beats the Olympus OM-D EM-5… just barely. Image quality off both camera sensors is fantastic and nearly identical, but the GH3 edges out the EM-5 by just a little bit of dynamic range. The EM-5 is a little cheaper, though. Right now, the GH3 is fairly expensive, but what you pay for is the best camera in this format money can buy, and I’m not just talking about image quality.

    Other reviews cover a lot of things about image quality and technical specifications, far more in depth than I’ll go here. What I want to talk about is handling, video, and the general advantages of the Micro Four Thirds format.

    Chances are, if you are considering the GH3 at all, you fall under one of three categories. You are either a serious enthusiast, a professional photographer, or you want to make movies. This is probably not going to be your very first system camera, and it’s definitely not a point-and-shoot camera for amateurs. That’s not to say the GH3 is overly complicated or unapproachable if you’re new to photography, but I should think a cheaper camera would fit your needs fine.

    The GH3 is a very special camera, with lots to love for those who love cameras. If you’re a serious enthusiast, you should consider the EM-5 as well as the GH3. There are pros and cons for both cameras. I’ll let you go read up on the EM-5 on your own, but for the GH3, it has a lot in its favor. Top of the list is handling. The GH3 is the largest camera in the format, this is true, but what you gain in bulk and weight, you also gain in ergonomics. There are lots and lots of physical buttons, five of them customizable, and nearly all of them usable one-handed without any awkwardness. The software is fantastic, too, giving you additional programable buttons on the touch screen, as well as Panasonic’s fully configurable Quick Menu. There are tons and tons of options to set to get your camera working just the way you want it to. Everything is very well laid out and fairly intuitive. The dials and control wheels feel solid and work great. Even the largest of lenses balance very well on the GH3, thanks to its weight and best-in-format grip. Don’t let its size fool you though, it’s only a little heavier than the EM-5. Along with that size comes a very large battery. Technical specs I think are conservative on the lifespan of a charge, too. This is the best camera battery I’ve ever encountered, letting me shoot far longer than I am used to. All-in-all, the GH3 fits wonderfully in the hand, is very easy to shoot with, and gives you a huge amount of control. If you’re an enthusiast photographer or serious prosumer, the GH3 will not disappoint. As an enthusiast, though, you’ve got plenty of options in the format and you should look carefully at many other models that may be cheaper but still quite satisfying.

    If you are a professional, I think you’ll appreciate much of the same things enthusiasts do, like what I mentioned above. But there’s more in this camera that seems intended just for you. The Wi-Fi “Lumix Link” will let you upload images directly from the camera as you shoot, letting your customers see immediately what you’re doing. You can also use it to trigger the shutter remotely or change settings. If wireless isn’t your thing, there’s an HDMI port and AV port. I have to believe the fully articulated touch screen will let you make difficult shots easy, such as doing macro on a product at a weird angle. The DSLR-type body will be very familiar to you, as well, though this is a mirrorless camera which means it’s a much lighter camera than you’re probably used to (more on this later). If you work with video at all for hybrid products, the live electronic viewfinder during movie recording will be a welcome change from optical viewfinders. As I mentioned before, the battery is quite large, but if you need more juice and don’t want to switch batteries, there’s a (sold-seperately) battery grip that will improve handling with portrait shots and give you even more endurance on a shoot. You will probably get some use out of the flash synchro socket and/or hot shoe. The buffer seems to be quite huge, and with a fast card shooting RAW in burst mode, it’s very difficult to slow the camera down. There aren’t more than a handful of weatherproof lenses for Micro Four Thirds so far, but if you have any the GH3 is weatherproof and will give you a seal to protect your system while you’re shooting in wet environments. The camera is built with high quality, solid materials. All-in-all, the GH3 is perhaps the first Micro Four Thirds camera aimed squarely at the professional market, whether or not you’ve been tempted by the format before. It gives you enormous control, but gets out of your way when you’re working. If you are a professional photographer, you are sure to appreciate the design considerations Panasonic made to make this a…

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  2. 70 of 75 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Nice To Meet You, December 10, 2012
    By 
    Dionisio Kamanel (Miami,FL) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3K 16.05 MP Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera with 3-Inch OLED – Body Only (Black) (Electronics)

    I have been waiting for this camera for about 4 years. In 2008 I was looking for the best camera that excelled in both stills and video. I settled for a JVC camcorder which recorded in SD and took 5mp stills. I moved to a Sony SR-11 for HD and interlaced 10mp stills. I was unsatisfied with the stills of the Sony so I bought an Oly E-420 touted as the smallest DSLR to accompany my camcorder. For over a year I dealt with the cumbersome set up of camcorder, DSLR body, 2 lenses and a tripod with mixed results to boot.

    Enter the GH2 and 2 issues were somewhat solved at once. The 1st problem was bulk and the other being image quality. The stills of the GH2 was a major step up to my Oly E-620 and the video quality was also significantly upgraded as a result.

    Now finally to the GH3 {while comparing to the GH2… I say that the GH2 feels and looks like a toy, yet is quite a serious tool under the hood so to speak. The advantage of looking like a toy was the incognito factor. In contrast, the GH3 has an excellent form, feel and look to it. It fits like a glove for me when operating. As a photographer our camera is like an appendage after all. The GH3 with a 12-35mm attached is light and remains relatively compact.

    The location of levers and buttons are logically placed. I initially thought the lever to change from AF to MF was in a bad place and hard to turn. I was trying to make the adjustment with my forefinger (because I almost always have it mounted on a tripod) but it was clearly designed to be turned with the thumb which is stronger. I appreciate the ability to open the battery compartment and not have to remove my quick release tripod plate. I used to always accidently press the WB button of the GH2 and even change settings. The WB and ISO buttons are now on top. No more accidents.

    Another major improvement is the speed. The burst shots are very responsive with no lag writing to the card until after 30 shots or so. I use a San Disk 95 mbs write speed which shines now. I was amazed of the processor speed of the GH3 when I would finish doing a burst of 5 shots or so (always RAW) and then press the video button and start recording right away. I have missed many key moments in video on the GH2 because I was waiting for it to finish writing to the memory card.It absolutely destroys the GH2 on this.

    The electronic shutter is not virtually silent on a AF lens. You will hear the lens (not the body) make a small adjustment sound. This is still perfectly acceptable even in places demanding silence. One of the serious problems with Electronic Shutter is the bands / electronic stripes (like video of a CRT screen) that ruin images in certain artificial lighting.

    As a so called hybrid shooter I welcome the advantages of the GH3 over the GH2 in speed and ease of transition between the mediums. The 1st thing I noticed was the manual Movie Mode which is not placed after all the C (Custom Settings) but right after M (Manual). I often shoot in A (Aperture) Mode and switch to manual Movie mode so I have 3 less turns to do now. The other thing is when recording video on PASM in the GH2 it would default to the lowest Bit Rate 17 mbps. Now it records in whatever mode you have set up like the MOV 1080 60p @ 50mbps without having to switch to manual.

    I have a couple of gripes I am having a difficult time accepting though. The 1st is the EVF compared to the GH2. It now has a more “digitized” look to it. The noise (grain) is excessive in many cases. The EVF eye piece is much smaller also for some reason. A missing feature (that I miss anyways) is the “My Menu” found on the GH2 which lets you quickly access the last 5 menu features you used. I would use this to access things like formatting the memory card (instead of digging in the menu).
    I just finished a weekend of shooting multiple events related to Art Basel Miami and I found myself thoroughly enjoying the shooting experience even though I just received the camera a day prior. The excellent Lumix 12-35mm has a lot to do with my positive experience. A fellow video shooter with a Canon 1D was impressed with the Continual AF speed and accuracy of the GH3 via the rear view monitor. I like the extras like Level Gauge, Intravalometer and WiFi to name a few useful features added to the GH3. The battery life is greatly improved too. I took 100′s of stills and video clips the other night and it still showed 2 bars left. The GH2 has aweful banding on video especially with clear blue skies. I shot a beach scene w/ the GH3 (with bright blue skies) at 7mm on a Lumix 7-14mm and saw less banding. Many of the strong points of the GH2 made it to the GH3 like EX TELE Convert feature though it has it’s quirks.

    This hybrid is the best we have yet available, but it is not perfect. With present technology we could have had an even better solution by now IMO. Yet at $1300 I think this is a good value and worthy…

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  3. 43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Very Successful Upgrade, December 27, 2012
    By 
    Todd B (NH) –
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3K 16.05 MP Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera with 3-Inch OLED – Body Only (Black) (Electronics)
    Having now spent a few weeks with this camera I feel I can provide an honest review of the GH3 and how it compares to it’s well-regarded predecessor, the GH2. What seems clear from the onset of testing is that Panasonic has listened to the feedback it sought from photographers and videographers alike prior to designing a GH2 replacement. The body is much more solid and refined in it’s ergonomics and controls. This camera now feels as professional as it’s larger/heavier full frame and APS-C competitors (especially with the battery grip), but retains a nimbleness those cameras will never be able to match. The user interface is much more straight forward now and no longer requires a decryptor ring in order to select video shooting modes. In fact each menu option that is highlighted can now describe in detail what it’s purpose is before it is activated, deactivated or changed.

    The new OLED screen is simply stunning and accurately displays color and exposure, even in bright outdoor shooting. I find myself leaving an external monitor at home for my outdoor shoots because it just adds weight to my kit without really improving functionality. The viewfinder is nice as well, but I’ve noticed it can suffer from some image smearing around the outer edges if your eye is not perfectly aligned to it’s center. WiFi remote control works great on the Samsung Galaxy and Asus Transformer, but I have not yet tested it on iPads or iPhones. The 50mbps IPB codec is excellent and can be pushed further in grading and recovery than previous hacked GH2 codecs I’ve used. Dynamic range, noise/grain, low light performance and ISO color shift (no more green tinting at higher ISOs) all seem improved over the GH2.

    Raw still images have much better highlight recovery now as well. Where the GH2 has maybe 1/2 a stop of highlight recovery, the GH3 seems more like 1 to 1.5 stops of recovery which makes exposing for shadows much easier and is great when working in timelapse. Speaking of timelapse, the new electronic shutter feature and built-in intervalometer are brilliant. With the battery grip added you can take literally thousands of pictures in electronic shutter mode without killing the batteries. The only downside is that exposures greater than 1 sec in this mode are not (yet) available, so you will need to change over to the mechanical shutter for longer exposures. The camera can also be set to go into sleep mode when timelapsing in long intervals, further saving it’s already outstanding battery life. To date I have yet to run into any video moire problems, which appears to be a much more inflated issue online then is justified in the real world. My preferred video settings are Contrast -5, Sharpness 0, Saturation 0, NR -5.

    In conclusion, this is the camera I have been waiting for as a professional videographer and photographer. It does everything I need it to do in a light weight kit and does it exceedingly well given it’s price point.

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